Line at Lisson Gallery

What a great little group show to start the year with, Line has been curated by Drawing Room and calls upon fifteen artists to expand on the most simple of drawing marks into the three dimensional space of the 52 Bell Street Lisson Gallery (the other showing films by John Akomfrah).

Installation view, Lisson Gallery January 2016

Installation view, Lisson Gallery January 2016

One of the earlier works to the rear wall of the above photo, is a redrawn wall work by Sol LeWitt, Wall Drawing 157, was first made following written instruction from the artist in the early seventies. The conceptual nature of the art being that the instruction itself was as important as the physical realisation marked on the wall, well here, forty-plus years later the instructions can be followed in exactly the same way and though the wall maybe a different one, the reproduction of the idea is faultless. 

Much more messily a line of crudely dripped paint guides the viewer from the entrance up the stairs to the first floor, until you come to its creator sat by reception. The brilliantly titled Taking A Line For A Walk by Ceal Floyer simply ends when the paint in the barrel runs out. 

FormatL6-BR by Maximilian Schubert, 2016

FormatL6-BR by Maximilian Schubert, 2016

Above, a single brass plated steel line. Schubert tackles that familiarly awkward space between painting and sculpture, the meeting place of two and three dimensions. The work rests on the wall in all but one of its corners making for a shadow implying and confirming depth in a way the rest of the work cannot. 

Richard Long predictably makes an appearance with A Four Day Walk (A Line of Ground 94 Miles Long). Another artist that has used lines for decades and in so many more landscapes than a draftsman. Here a piece from the 80s adorns a wall and transcribes another of his epic walks across England. 

Raumzeichnung (outside/inside) by Monika Grzymala, 2016

Raumzeichnung (outside/inside) by Monika Grzymala, 2016

The first space presents the most assaulting work, a swirling maelstrom of lines of black tape along the wall and floor and ceiling merging into a wall of clear tape suspending the black lines, now broken, all the way to the window on Bell Street. It fills the room and disorientates the viewer, passing as it does from two to three dimensions. 

http://www.lissongallery.com/exhibitions/line until March 12th